Online Marketing Services

Online Marketing Services
Why Me? Hire me for any of your online marketing needs

Qualifications

You have reached Heather's Portfolio and Resume. For her portfolio, please visit the links to the left for her writing style and samples. You will also see testimonials as well as her current resume posted. She is available for paid content writing, website writing, blog posts and articles as well as social media engagement for your business. To get in touch with her, please contact her via her contact button.

Qualifications for Marketing Management and Operations/Project Management/Content Development professional


Results-driven leader with over ten years of progressive experience related to communications and marketing operations that include directing sales growth for consumer energy offerings, driving the development, launch, and growth of technology offerings in the telecommunications industry and growing a contracting business associated with online content development, working with consumer brands and social media consulting. Consistently has achieved a track record of exceeding sales goals by as much as 200%. Exceptional communicator recognized for effectively presenting, educating and communicating to different audience levels ranging from executive to individual contributors in sales and marketing channels, credit and collections functions as well as in social media. Skilled in SAP/CRM technologies, Microsoft Office Programs, Windows Vista, MS Project, Visio and FrontPage; Adobe Photoshop. Areas of expertise include:


Project Planning / Management

Vendor Management

Promotions/Presentations

Product Launch / Marketing

Project Management

Training / Development

Market Research Analysis / Implementation

Content Development and Distribution

Quality Analysis/Quality Auditing

Sales/Marketing Campaign Analysis

Internet/Intranet Technologies

Internet/Intranet Publishing


Key Contributions


Created the website Dallas Single Mom as an affiliate marketing website in 2011 that targets parents and families in the Dallas-Fort Worth area through events information, product reviews, deals and giveaways. Achieved monumental success by averaging anywhere from 25,000 to 30,000 pageviews a month via Google Analytics, achieving 5,262 Facebook Likes and 5,352 Twitter followers. Part of a list of preferred parenting bloggers and social media consultants with article writing experience with Examiner.com, Care.com and CBS Local.


Effectively managed all dunning communications activities to TXU Energy customers in 2011 contributing to reducing bad debt expenses by 50% and continuing in 2012 on trend to be at least $21 million dollars under plan. Presented findings to executive leadership and continually fine tunes all communication processes for active and inactive collections.


Effectively collaborated with consumer survey software to measure consumer reaction to sales activities and marketing activities at TXU Energy. Implemented survey tools into internal communication and information databases in order to provide better research and insight to the consumer product development and campaign management teams to determine pricing, campaign launch strategies and sales targets.


In the first 6 months of 2009 at TXU Energy, operated in a dual role as acting Call Center Vendor Manager and Marketing Associate, taking on additional responsibility and exceeding sales results and sale per hour targets. Results - Outbound Acquisition sales were averaging 206% over goal for the 1Q2009


Effectively able to utilize a variety of systems databases, online content management systems, coding for intranet and internet sites, developing training and delivering training via Livemeeting and WebEx.


Friday, September 13, 2013

What your Google Search History says about you

Google has done a fantastic job at capturing data. They are the #1 search engine and for good reason since they are the experts at finding out what it is you want to read about. I have used Google since I was in high school and no other search engine even comes close to providing answers to all of life's questions. It's not a surprise to figure out what it is you can learn from Google, especially about yourself. Just type in https://history.google.com/history/ and you will get an analysis of your search history.

Google Search History Information for my - Dallas Single Mom Examiner

This data about myself is pretty useful. Everything from my top queries via my Google Account as well as top clicks and searches. This is the tracking of all of my web activity. It shows where I have been and gives me an idea of my thoughts for today.

Why I feel that this says a lot about you is because you can almost tell where your moods have gone to for that day as well as what was important to you at that point in time. It divides it up into categories from news, shopping, blogs, travel and more. 

It collects information on the following (taken from the Google Help Site)

Your activityBrowser details
  • Pages you visit
  • Searches on Google
  • Information about your search results, including private results
  • Ads you respond to by clicking the ad itself or completing a transaction on an advertiser’s site
  • Internet Protocol address
  • Browser type
  • Browser language
  • One or more cookies that may uniquely identify your browser


My Google history definitely shows that I am a blogger and a writer with a lot of varied tastes. I think my tastes are eclectic and abundant. I'm so excited to get a glimpse into my days by having this tool. 

So what does your Google Search History say about you?

Friday, April 26, 2013

What are the communication norms in your meetings?

I was speaking to a fellow coworker about Toastmasters and why she wants to improve her communication skills. One of the things she mentioned that I have found is prevalent in the workplace is how meeting norms and communication can change depending upon the social culture that is prevalent in a company or organization.

All meetings should follow a set of norms and when a meeting doesn't follow this, it can be confusing for new meeting participants and can affect productivity.

Some guidelines to follow are:

1) Start on Time

2) Give enough time when scheduling a meeting - nothing bugs people than inviting them to a meeting the day of or just a few minutes before it starts.

3) Know your audience - who are you inviting? Are they the appropriate people or do they know who should attend?

4) Have an agenda - an agenda helps people prepare their thoughts and ideas for the meeting. Invite people to add to agenda if need be. An agenda also helps individuals determine if they need to be there, if they can send a replacement in their place and or if they can answer questions if they cannot attend

5) Stay on topic

6) Take Notes and send out follow up notes after the meeting

These seem like very simple guidelines but I have been in so many meetings that don't follow some or all of these. The person I spoke with discussed her experience at a different company where meetings were more formal and the person that presented had the podium (the floor) and everyone waited for the presentation to be over before they had questions. The company that I am presently at has a different set of norms. Meetings can be very impromptu or they can be very formal depending upon the audience in the room.

Getting to know the audience your speaking to can make meetings very effective and productive.

Wednesday, March 20, 2013

Your business card is an extension of you

In the next few days I will be attending a lot of different conferences and events where I will be giving out and receiving many business cards. Many years ago I started my professional career in Hawaii, which follows many business etiquette rules associated with Asian cultural preferences, specifically Japanese. Here and there being in TX, I may have become more casual to the practice but I must reiterate how important your business card is - It's an extension of you!

The reason why I have to stress this is because business cards should be received and cared for in the same way you'd like to business - with care and compassion. I really take notice of how a person receives a card to demonstrate their character. Here's an example:

You are at a conference and a person has a binder full of business cards. They take your business card, quickly scan it and put it in their binder and quickly move on. OR they have a hole puncher and they quickly add it to a ring.
How would you feel if your business card was just another card in the pile? It doesn't feel very good. Take some time to really recognize someone and the value that they can provide for you. If it's someone that you don't know very well, follow their lead. Receive the business card in the same way that they gave you the business card.

Follow up

Business cards seem antiquated with the smartphones and the technology that we have today, however business cards are the personalized image we have of ourselves and our companies. So treat them with care and follow-up. Even if it's just to say Hi, follow up with them and contact them. Learn a little bit about their company and who they are and reference it when you contact them. Ask them if there's anything they need right now or would like a referral for something. It's not necessary to have a pitch but you are establishing a relationship.

Treat a business card like your personal signature - with care!

Tuesday, March 12, 2013

How much investment do you have in YOUR startup?

Reid Hoffman, the cofounder of LinkedIn, shared this wonderful slide-share presentation about managing your career with an entrepreneurial mindset. This wednesday, 03/13, I will be presenting a speech in Toastmaster's entitled, "Don't Sell Yourself Short." This speech is my speech #9 and is meant to persuade individuals with an end task in mind. This goal includes some of the elements associated with what is in this presentation. This presentation is just phenomenal and I really wanted to share it here!



Tuesday, February 19, 2013

District 25 Toastmasters: Making Table Topics Fun and Different

For one of my Toastmaster's meetings, I am tasked with the opportunity to come up with Table Topic ideas. Table topics are a way for Toastmaster's members to learn how to speak effectively off the cuff and unprepared. at Toastmaster's, table topic speeches are typically one to two minutes long. As a part of District 25, I thought these Table Topics tips were great for coming up with ideas.

District 25 Toastmasters: Making Table Topics Fun and Different: Toastmasters meetings that are fun and entertaining as well as educational will encourage members and guests to return. One of the best ways...

One of the takeaways I got from this is if you are a corporate club, you can and should bring the value of Toastmaster's back to the organization. One of the ideas was to present an opportunity for members to speak about delivering bad news OR good news to your fellow Toastmaster's.

Why is this beneficial?

At a woman's conference I went to one of the executives discussed that one of the keys to your career is being able to identify HOW a person communicates. This is important if an individual does not want to participate in office politics. You may not want to be a participant, however, it's still a part of the communications process. By being a great observer, you can identify another person's style and get a checklist of what is important to them. That way you can use that information yourself.

With a table topic idea, being able to identify your member's "pain points' or areas that concern them within the company, you can create a relevant atmosphere to assist with their career development. Toastmasters IS a safe place to practice communications and build confidence so that when an individual is ready they can approach others in the workplace about problems, opportunities and new ideas.

This is one of the key reasons I joined Toastmasters.

Thursday, February 14, 2013

Toastmaster's - How speaking has helped in my career

Yesterday I completed Speech #6 for my company's local chapter of Toastmaster's. Speech #6 is vocal variety. Vocal variety includes varying your tone, your pace as well as your pitch. Since it is presently Valentine's Day I presented a speech that surrounded the holiday as well as love as a single individual all the way up advice on marriage. Here were some of the comments I received on my speech:


Heather: Congratulations on winning the Golden Toaster!   I feel that you did an excellent job.  Your presentation was superb.  You were truly able to engage the audience.  There was seriousness and there was humor.  You made the audience relate to what you were talking about and the presentation was wonderful.   You had excellent eye contact as well as outstanding voice tone.  Hats Off To You! Thank A+

LaReta Mayweather

I was pleased to provide such an entertaining and informative speech to my fellow Toastmasters. The thing I love about Toastmasters is that I can definitely see how these skills can get transferred to your work/career life. Being able to get up to do a prepared speech teaches you the process of organization, communications, and presenting. I also notice that being able to organize your thoughts in  your head before communicating is one of the best ways to better communicate at work. Many times we have a knee jerk reaction to things and I believe that being able to assess your communication style and tailor it to your audience helps make you a better communicator.

Toastmaster's also teaches you how to give feedback. I have noticed that I'm better at being able to truly listen in order to give feedback whether it's a problem, a presentation or even an email. I can ascertain where the speaker is coming from and then be able to communicate back OR to give back strengths and opportunities. In Toastmaster's, we use a 3 - 2 - 1 style of feedback with 3 Strengths, 2 areas of opportunity and 1 great takeaway. I believe you can use this at work, at church or in any area of your life where you must give feedback. 

Later I'll be posting a video of my speech for your enjoyment. Recording our speeches, shows us where we need improvement and is a valuable tool for learning. 

Learn more about Toastmasters at http://www.toastmasters.org/.